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BuddhaForce

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[BS File] Building An American Gestapo
« on: June 07, 2015, 11:21:48 PM »
The BS File is an open source intelligence file where forum users can contribute related content to a specific topic. The goal is to build over time, an archive of knowledge on the subject, and to draw connections between people, places, and events that would otherwise may have been unnoticed. Information in the file all links to original, open sources, and readers will have to decide for themselves whether the source or the information is reliable, to come to their own conclusions.


Building An American Gestapo




You may or may not have noticed recently, but a monumental shift in policing is taking place in America.  Whether it was after Pittsburgh in 2009Oakland in 2011, Boston in 2013, Ferguson in 2014, or Baltimore in 2015, the evolution from peace officers to a military force has been shockingly vivid.

Bear in mind that these changes have taken place over a long period of time. Incrementalism is often times the best disguise for change. But despite these changes being spread across decades, one thing is for certain, there is no sign of this trend stopping, despite lip service to the contrary from our public leaders. The very fact that these changes have spanned across so many years, so many administrations, and so many different bodies of law-makers, all of whom at any time could have changed course if they wanted, shows that there is a concerted effort to drive this agenda, to its ultimate destination.

So Whether you believe that this transformation is required to keep people safe in this brave new world, or the setting of a very dangerous precedent, you need to understand that this is all building up to something, and that this will affect everyone sooner or later. With that in mind, we will begin to track the concerted efforts of Government agencies to militarize, nationalize, and institutionalize the American police forces into a para-military army.


- A timeline based on Radley Balko's book "Rise of the Warrior Cop," plots the transformation of the police from 1966 to 2005, into a paramilitary force.  This is done largely on the back of the War on Drugs. Source.


Please note that this is not intended to vilify police officers. For every bad officer there is just as many good ones if not more. I believe this is substantially true of any subset of the population. However, in the quest to survive and make a living, many will be forced to follow along on the course to para-military nationalization. So we point out these facts in order to somehow reverse this deleterious trend in the United States.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2015, 03:36:01 PM by Mr.X »
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BuddhaForce

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Re: Building An American Gestapo
« Reply #1 on: June 07, 2015, 11:28:01 PM »
A timeline of police militarization
http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/fault-lines/FaultLinesBlog/2014/2/25/a-history-of-policemilitarization.html



1966; SWAT is born

LAPD Inspector Daryl Gates, who would serve as police chief from 1978 to 1992, begins to trumpet the development of an elite squad trained in military tactics to respond to complex threats, like the previous summer?s Watts riots?which included looting and police being fired on by snipers. Gates invited a group of ex-Marines to train a small unit. He called it SWAT, for Special Weapons Attack Team. The acronym would later be toned down to Special Weapons and Tactics.


August 1, 1966; Texas tower shootings

Ex-Marine Charles Whitman goes on a shooting rampage at the University of Texas in Austin, killing 15 people. The massacre increases the momentum for the development of SWAT teams in large cities around the country.


December 6, 1969; The first SWAT raid

In its first raid, Gates? SWAT team storms the L.A. headquarters of the Black Panther Party. Five thousand rounds of ammunition are exchanged between the police and the Black Panthers, with four men on each side sustaining injuries. There were no deaths in the multi-hour standoff.


July 29, 1970; Legalization of no-knock warrants

President Richard Nixon signs the District of Columbia Court Reform and Criminal Procedure Act of 1970, a bill aimed specifically at lowering crime in the Washington, D.C., area. It includes a controversial no-knock provision that allows police officers to enter a home to serve a warrant without alerting the people inside to their presence. Three months later, Nixon signs an omnibus drug bill that extends that authority to police precincts beyond the capital.


December 1, 1981; Knowledge sharing between military and police

The Military Cooperation with Law Enforcement Agencies Act is enacted. In his 2006 white paper for the Cato Institute, ?Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Police Raids in America,? Balko writes, the law ?authorized the military to train civilian police officers to use the newly available equipment and not only encouraged the military to share drug-war-related information with civilian police but authorized the military to take an active role in preventing drugs from entering the country.?


October 12, 1984; ?Policing for profit? era begins

Under the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984, civilian law enforcement agencies working with the feds on drug cases get a cut of assets seized during raids. According to Balko, it has a profound effect ?on drug policing over the next 30 years.? Retired LAPD Commander Stephen Downing refers to this policy as ?policing for profit.? The provision was an augmentation of the RICO law passed in 1970, which allows the government to go after any property involved in the commission of a crime.


November 18, 1988; Government grants for local police

So-called Byrne grants are created as part of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. The program, named in honor of fallen New York City cop Edward Byrne, resulted in the transfer of billions of dollars from the federal government to local police agencies. Strong drug enforcement stats were key to getting the grants, which pushed police departments to form narcotics task forces wholly focused on conducting drug raids.


September 23, 1996; Transferring military equipment to police

The Law Enforcement Support Program, which makes it even easier to transfer military property to local police forces, is created as part of the National Defense Authorization Security Act of 1997. In the more than 15 years since the program began, more than $4.3 billion worth of equipment has been transferred to civilian police.


2005; SWAT and small-town America

SWAT teams serve an increasing number of search warrants. According to statistics from Peter Kraska at Eastern Kentucky University, 50,000 to 60,000 SWAT raids took place in the United States in 2005?up from 30,000 in 1995.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2015, 03:35:21 PM by Mr.X »
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BuddhaForce

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Re: Building An American Gestapo
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2015, 11:36:51 PM »
Al Sharpton calls for the DoJ to step in and nationalize the police.
http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/politics/bs-md-ci-sharpton-summit-20150430-story.html#

This one was a little more overt...
« Last Edit: June 10, 2015, 12:01:30 AM by Mr.X »
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BuddhaForce

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Re: Building An American Gestapo
« Reply #3 on: June 07, 2015, 11:45:08 PM »
The Government's new policy on Nationalizing the police.
http://www.cops.usdoj.gov/pdf/taskforce/Interim_TF_Report.pdf

Created by an Executive Order of President Obama, this group was tasked to find solutions on how fix the out-of-control police who are gunning down citizens at the astonishing rate one person every three days so far in 2015. This is the report that will go on to create policy in this country. Mark my words. Here is my page by page analysis for SuchBS.com



21st century policing...ominous

pg. 5 - Given 90 days to complete...they held seven public "listening" sessions. This made sure they would be informed! Its a "remarkable achievement"!

pg. 10 - Task force created by Obama on Dec. 18, 2014.
"People are more likely to obey the law when they believe those who are enforcing it have the right?the legitimate authority?to tell them what to do." - wow that says a lot.

pg. 11 - they will question our long-held truth about policing.
Hearings held in Washington D.C., twice...hmmm. Phoenix and Cincinnati.

pg. 12 - "Paramount among them was how to bring unity of purpose and consensus on best practices to a nation with 18,000 separate law enforcement  agencies and a strong history of a preference for local control of local issues."

pg. 16 - To achieve legitimacy: mitigate implicit bias. What is implicit bias? bias you don't even know that you have! how is anybody gonna know you have implicit bias? Who decides?

pg. 21 - implementing procedural justice is top-down! Where is the top? DOJ. Remember we are talking about comprehensive reform of the ENTIRE criminal justice system.

pg. 22 - Police should get involved more in community outreach, reference to Police Athletic Leagues by witness Carmen Perez. Troubling since in the past, these outreach programs have been used to gather intelligence on Americans ( https://firstlook.org/theintercept/2015/01/21/spies-among-us-community-outreach-programs-muslims-blur-lines-outreach-intelligence/ )

1.5.1 Action Item: "Law enforcement agencies should institute residency incentive programs such as Resident Officer Programs." Very toublesome. Not incentives for cops who live in a neighborhood. Free house for cop who agrees to go into neighborhood.

pg. 24 - 1.7.1 ACTION ITEM: The Federal Government should develop survey tools and instructions for use of such a model to prevent local departments from incurring the expense and to allow for consistency across jurisdictions.  They need public surveys of if customers are "happy" with their police service. What is it going to be privatized? Will we just switch companies if our police aren't doing a good job? Again teh Feds will be coming in on this one. Direct federal assumption of local police authority.

1.8 RECOMMENDATION: Law enforcement agencies should strive to create a workforce that contains a broad range of diversity including race, gender, language, life experience, and cultural background to improve understanding and effectiveness in dealing with all communities.
A good idea but a troublesome policy. Creates quotas. Hard to remove people who fill quotas, etc.

Diversification throughout entire department is ultimate goal. Shakeup at all levels of law enforcement. Who will decide how diverse/who gets in? you guessed it...

1.8.1 ACTION ITEM: The Federal Government should create a Law Enforcement Diversity Initiative designed to help communities diversify law enforcement departments to reflect the demographics of the community.
Yes the Feds will of course oversee the development of hiring practices and "diversification" standards/quotas. But wait, theres more...

1.8.2 ACTION ITEM: The department overseeing this initiative should help localities learn best practices for recruitment, training, and outreach to improve the diversity as well as the cultural and linguistic responsiveness of law enforcement agencies.

The should also help your local police department "learn" (read: tell them) what best practices are for recruiting, training and "outreach" (a.k.a. intelligence gathering). Thats pretty solid federal control. recruiting, training, "outreach."

pg. 25 - 1.8.4 ACTION ITEM: Discretionary federal funding for law enforcement programs could be influenced by that department?s efforts to improve their diversity and cultural and linguistic responsiveness.

Money could (see: will) be squeezed off if these local outfits don't get with the program and stick with it.

1.8.5 ACTION ITEM: Law enforcement agencies should be encouraged to explore more flexible staffing models.

The report says this is to give them "flexible schedules." My question: Private contractors? Watch provisions for flexible staffing models carefully...

1.9 RECOMMENDATION: Law enforcement agencies should build relationships based on trust with immigrant communities. This is central to overall public safety.

Read a little farther down for the real meaning of this nonesense: "It is the view of this task force that whenever possible, state and local law enforcement should not be involved in immigration enforcement."

That should rile up the patriot groups lol.


pg. 26 - 1.9.3 ACTION ITEM: The U.S. Department of Justice should remove civil immigration information from the FBI?s National Crime Information Center database.

What is this??? Wonder if it has to do with the tens of thousands of FBI informants?

pg. 28 - FBI and National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) could also benefit police practice and research endeavors. Be wary of getting the FBI mixed up in this thing for god sakes.

2.1.1 2.1.1 ACTION ITEM: The Federal Government should incentivize this collaboration through a variety of programs that focus on public health, education, mental health, and other programs not traditionally part of the criminal justice system.

Again, federal dollars = federal control.

pg. 29 - 2.2.2 ACTION ITEM: These policies should also mandate external and independent criminal investigations in cases of police use of force resulting in death, officer-involved shootings resulting in injury or death, or in-custody deaths.

Read on a little further: "One way this can be accomplished is by the creation of multi-agency force investigation task forces." multi-agency task forces. Will it include DHS? DOJ? any federal government agency? Read on a little further: Other ways to structure this investigative process include referring to neighboring jurisdictions or to the next higher levels of government. Bingo, next higher level of government! That could definitely include the Feds.

pg. 30 - 2.2.4 ACTION ITEM: Policies on use of force should also require agencies to collect, maintain, and report data to the Federal Government on all officer-involved shootings, whether fatal or nonfatal, as well as any in-custody death.

You report to the Feds, then they are your boss.

2.2.5 ACTION ITEM: Policies on use of force should clearly state what types of information will be released, when, and in what situation, to maintain transparency.

big focus on protecting the peoples "rights" of privacy and not compromising the investigation. When they say transparency, just assume cover-up.

pg. 31 - Wowie. this a big one...  2.4 RECOMMENDATION: Law enforcement agencies are encouraged to adopt identification procedures that implement scientifically supported practices that eliminate or minimize presenter bias or influence.

What does this mean? Eyewitnesses are not credible! What we need is scientifically supported practices that eliminate bias or influence in identifying a suspect. Like hair samples, because those are never wrong, ever...oh wait. http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/crime/fbi-overstated-forensic-hair-matches-in-nearly-all-criminal-trials-for-decades/2015/04/18/39c8d8c6-e515-11e4-b510-962fcfabc310_story.html

Remember when they said it was time to "question our long-held truths about policing"? Well eyewitness testimony could be a thing of the past...

pg. 32 - 2.6 RECOMMENDATION: Law enforcement agencies should be encouraged to collect, maintain, and analyze demographic data on all detentions (stops, frisks, searches, summons, and arrests). This data should be disaggregated by school and non-school contacts.

Again, we are trying to cut down on profiling, but we now need officers to keep track of whether the pwerson the arrested or stopped was of such and such ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, because you know...demographics and statistics...

pg. 33 - 2.6.1 ACTION ITEM: The Federal Government could further incentivize universities and other organizations to partner with police departments to collect data and develop knowledge about analysis and benchmarks as well as to develop tools and templates that help departments manage data collection and analysis.

Yep, Federal Funds, for colleges and universities, to partner with police, to collect data on you, the citizens of your community. Why? For demographics and stuff. Its what we are gonna use for hiring cops, we promise.

2.7 RECOMMENDATION: Law enforcement agencies should create policies and procedures for policing mass demonstrations that employ a continuum of managed tactical resources that are designed to minimize the appearance of a military operation and avoid using provocative tactics and equipment that undermine civilian trust.

As an example they use the Chicago Police Department...Chicago PD should never, ever, ever, be used as an example of what to aspire to. EVER.

pg. 33-34 - 2.7.2 ACTION ITEM: The Federal Government should create a mechanism for investigating complaints and issuing sanctions regarding the inappropriate use of equipment and tactics during mass demonstrations.

Totally laughable. Why not just take away the MILITARY EQUIPMENT. Why on Earth do they need MINE RESISTANT armored vehicles? Why on Earth do they need 40mm GRENADE LAUNCHERS? Nope, instead we are just gonna set up some rules on how often you can play with your rent-a-soldier toys.

2.8 RECOMMENDATION: Some form of civilian oversight of law enforcement is important in order to strengthen trust with the community. Every community should define the appropriate form and structure of civilian oversight to meet the needs of that community.

Read on for their comments: IT's probably important, but we don't have any evidence that it is...We will examine it more, maybe...

pg. 35 - 2.8.2 ACTION ITEM: The U.S. Department of Justice?s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) should provide technical assistance and collect best practices from existing civilian oversight efforts and be prepared to help cities create this structure, potentially with some matching grants and funding.

Feds will create the oversight system. I don't get more plain english then that. COPS office will do it.

pg. 37 - 2.13 RECOMMENDATION: The U.S. Department of Justice, through the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services and Office of Justice Programs, should provide technical assistance and incentive funding to jurisdictions with small police agencies that take steps towards shared services, regional training, and consolidation.

Super dangerous. For some reason they seem to think that BIGGER is BETTER. Small police agencies with less that 10 officers are the problem. We should give them money to consolidate and share services. consolidation = centralization. They mention some weird thing about an English minimum of 1,000 employees or more? What the hell is this about? service-sharing is letting small town agencies use a wider variety of training, equipment, and communications technology. Stuff they couldn't get on their own. Gee...I wonder if they are talking about MRAPs and StingRays?

Table #1 -  goal is to have all police agencies with at least 1,000 officers minimum.

pg. 41 - 3.1 RECOMMENDATION: The U.S. Department of Justice, in consultation with the law enforcement field, should broaden the efforts of the National Institute of Justice to establish national standards for the research and development of new technology. These standards should also address compatibility and interoperability needs both within law enforcement agencies and across agencies and jurisdictions and maintain civil and human rights protections.

National standards again. It's pretty explicit.

"Inconsistent or non-existent standards also lead to isolated and fractured information systems that cannot effectively manage, store, analyze, or share their data with other systems. As a result, much information is lost or unavailable?which allows vital information to go unused and have no impact on crime reduction efforts."

Sounds like a thinnly veiled call for an NSA-like super information sharing program.

pg. 42 - Further on: Critical problems: no real methods of near real-time information sharing exist. They need them because...TERRORISM....AND....CYBERTERRORISM

3.1.1 ACTION ITEM: The Federal Government should support the development and delivery of training to help law enforcement agencies learn, acquire, and implement technology tools and tactics that are consistent with the best practices of 21st century policing.

This means the Feds should support (monetary/personnel/etc.) police departments with upgrading technology to NAtional Standards for...near real-time information sharing.

pg. 43 - 3.3 RECOMMENDATION: The U.S. Department of Justice should develop best practices that can be adopted by state legislative bodies to govern the acquisition, use, retention, and dissemination of auditory, visual, and biometric data by law enforcement.

Here it is. DOJ needs to create legislation for your States to adopt, that governs the AQUISITION, USE, & RETENTION of BIOMETRIC DATA. What is biometric data. Why is that problematic?

pg. 44 -  3.4 RECOMMENDATION: Federal, state, local, and tribal legislative bodies should be encouraged to update public record laws.

Be on the look out for updates of public records laws.

pg. 46 - 3.6 RECOMMENDATION: The Federal Government should support the development of new ?less than lethal? technology to help control combative suspects.

Yep. It's time to roll out some new less than lethal tech. Although you would be surprised just how lethal less than lethal can be.

pg. 47 - 3.6.1 ACTION ITEM: Relevant federal agencies, including the U.S. Departments of Defense and Justice, should expand their efforts to study the development and use of new less than lethal technologies and evaluate their impact on public safety, reducing lethal violence against citizens, Constitutionality, and officer safety.

We call for getting the DoD involved in providing new technology to law enforcement agencies (non-lethal of course, at least in the beginning).

3.7 RECOMMENDATION: The Federal Government should make the development and building of segregated radio spectrum and increased bandwidth by FirstNet for exclusive use by local, state, tribal, and federal public safety agencies a top priority.

Private band for government officials within the U.S. for sending data back and forth, including video transmission from body cams.

pg. 50 - Our first taste of the phrase "informal social control". See - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Informal_social_control

Law enforcement agencies should be tasked with contributing to the  and strengthening neighborhood capacity to prevent and reduce crime.

4.2 RECOMMENDATION: Community policing should be infused throughout the culture and organizational structure of law enforcement agencies.

Yes we need to infuse community policing into all aspects of LEA's to socially control people to conform to the norms and laws.

pg. 51 - 4.2.2 ACTION ITEM: Law enforcement agencies should evaluate their patrol deployment practices to allow sufficient time for patrol officers to participate in problem solving and community engagement activities.

This is curious. Time will need to be alotted for officers to participate in community policing.

pg. 52 - The U.S. Department of Justice should collaborate with others to develop and disseminate baseline models of this crisis intervention team approach that can be adapted to local contexts.

Again, here we see that the new standards of policing, the baselines, the model, will come from the Feds.

pg. 54 - Now we are getting into the weird. Community policing is all about getting the community involved in public safety. So what is the recommendation?

4.5.2 ACTION ITEM: Law enforcement agencies should engage youth and communities in joint training with law enforcement, citizen academies, ride-alongs, problem solving teams, community action teams, and quality of life teams.

I mean, what are we talking about here? police training for citizens? Are we raising an army of irregulars? Neighborhood militia?

pg. 55 - 4.6.2 ACTION ITEM: In order to keep youth in school and to keep them from criminal and violent behavior, law enforcement agencies should work with schools to encourage the creation of alternatives to student suspensions and expulsion through restorative justice, diversion, counseling, and family interventions.

This one is pretty wild. Family interventions by the police and educators for not going to school?

"The Federal Government could incentivize schools to adopt this practice by tying federal funding to schools implementing restorative justice practices."

Here is where we make sure that schools get on board with the new policing program.

4.6.4 ACTION ITEM: Law enforcement agencies should work with schools to adopt an instructional approach to discipline that uses interventions or disciplinary consequences to help students develop new behavior skills and positive strategies to avoid conflict, redirect energy, and refocus on learning.

A bizarre suggestion here that LEAs should help schools adopt a new approach to discipline that helps students develop new behavior skills.

pg. 56 - 4.6.5 ACTION ITEM: Law enforcement agencies should work with schools to develop and monitor school discipline policies with input and collaboration from school personnel, students, families, and community members. These policies should prohibit the use of corporal punishment and electronic control devices.

4.6.6 ACTION ITEM: Law enforcement agencies should work with schools to create a continuum of developmentally appropriate and proportional consequences for addressing ongoing and escalating student misbehavior after all appropriate interventions have been attempted.

Yes the your new Federal police force should be in your childs school, monitoring and devoloping the schools discipline policies. Of course beatings and tasers for the kids *SHOULD* be prohibited. How much wiggle room is in the word "should?" Well of course law enforcement should work with the schools to create a continuum of proportional consequences to any escalating student misbehavior.

pg. 59 - Now for the heavy stuff. Officers need training and knowledge to fight terrorism. What knowledge would that be?  Well for example, "the links between normal criminal activity and terrorism."  Also there are many notes on the fact that terrorism is evolving...What is it evolving to? scary question.

pg. 60 - The Federal Government should support the development of partnerships with training facilities across the country to promote consistent standards for high quality training and establish training innovation hubs.

There is the model for Federal training of cops. We will rebrand police academies as regional "training innovation hubs." Federal funding can be a powerful incentive for develping and implementing 21st Century American Policing TM.

pg. 61 - Another mention here of citizens being trained alongside officers.
An interesting mention of implementing a leadership program to all LEA personnel throughout their careers, based on one developed at The US Military Academy, West Point.

5.3.1 ACTION ITEM: Recognizing that strong, capable leadership is required to create cultural transformation, the U.S. Department of Justice should invest in developing learning goals and model curricula/training for each level of leadership.

DOJ will be investing in developing this national police leadership program, rooted in militaristic training.

pg. 62 - 5.4  RECOMMENDATION: The U.S. Department of Justice should develop, in partnership with institutions of higher education, a national postgraduate institute of policing for senior executives with a standardized curriculum preparing them to lead agencies in the 21st century.

A call for a national postgrad institute for training top level police executives in the new force. Again it will be modeled on the military, this time Navy. Completeion in the Federal course will qualify one to serve as chief police executives anywhere in the US. Again we are talking top level control by the Federal Government. They will teach, and train your top level police chiefs.

pg. 63 - Here we call for training cops on how to spot someone with "mental illness." this is called Crisis Intervention Training (CIT). Lots of talk about a mental health crisis.

5.6.1 ACTION ITEM: Because of the importance of this issue, Congress should appropriate funds to help support law enforcement crisis intervention training.

BOOM, apparently the mental health crisis in America is so monumental, we will need the Feds to step in and fund the training programs.

pg. 66 - 5.11 RECOMMENDATION: The Federal Government, as well as state and local agencies, should encourage and incentivize higher education for law enforcement officers.

Federal subsidy's for cop college. Bu wait, there's more...

5.11.1 ACTION ITEM: The Federal Government should create a loan repayment and forgiveness incentive program specifically for policing.

Ahh yes, so not only will taxpayers subsidize the creation of a 21st century american policing curriculum, the training innovation hubs, and cop colleges, but also taxpayers should bear the cost of educating the cops through a debt forgiveness plan.

pg. 67 - 5.13 RECOMMENDATION: The U.S. Department of Justice should support the development and implementation of improved Field Training Officer programs.

These are senior level people who will train new officers in the field to impart "the organizational culture" of the new 21st Century American Policing program. This is deemed a "critical" step to changing "officer culture." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_Training_Officer

Hmm, so the Feds are going to "support" a new and improved FTO program, what does that mean?

5.13.1 ACTION ITEM: The U.S. Department of Justice should support the development of broad Field Training Program standards and training strategies that address changing police culture and organizational procedural justice issues that agencies can adopt and customize to local needs.

Ohh so the DoJ is going to write up the standards and new improved curriculum for the FTO program. Well at least they get to customize it to their local needs.

5.13.2 ACTION ITEM: The U.S. Department of Justice should provide funding to incentivize agencies to update their Field Training Programs in accordance with the new standards.

Yep, bribe 'em with taxpayer money. Go crazy.

pg. 68 - Heres a chuckle-worthy line: "However, a large proportion of officer injuries and deaths are not the result of interaction with criminal offenders but the outcome of poor physical health due to poor nutrition, lack of exercise, sleep deprivation, and substance abuse."

pg. 69 - "According to estimates of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 100,000 law enforcement professionals are injured in the line of duty each year. Many are the result of assaults, which underscores the need for body armor, but most are due to vehicular accidents."

Yep, cops need more body armor.

pg. 70 - 6.1.1 ACTION ITEM: Congress should establish and fund a national ?Blue Alert? warning system.

Yes lets gin up hysteria. "Leveraging the current Amber Alert program used to locate abducted children, the Blue Alert would enlist the help of thepublic in finding suspects after a law enforcement officer is killed in the line of duty."

pg. 76 - Figure 2. Total fatalities from 1964?2014

An interesting chart that show police fatalities are at an all-time low. Contrast that to charts that show police killings are at an all-time high.

pg. 77 - 7.1 RECOMMENDATION: The President should direct all federal law enforcement agencies to review the recommendations made by the Task Force on 21st Century Policing and, to the extent practicable, to adopt those that can be implemented at the federal level.

7.2 RECOMMENDATION: The U.S. Department of Justice should explore public-private partnership opportunities, starting by convening a meeting with local, regional, and national foundations to discuss the proposals for reform described in this report and seeking their engagement and support in advancing implementation of these recommendations.

7.3 RECOMMENDATION: The U.S. Department of Justice should charge its Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office) with assisting the law enforcement field in addressing current and future challenges.

Yes the good old public-private partnership. Looks like think-tanks and foundations will be drafting the programs. COPS office will spearhead from the top.

"Create a National Policing Practices and Accountability Division within the COPS Office."

That is probablly the most explicit reference to a National Police force yet.

"Prioritize grant funding to departments meeting benchmarks."

Theres the ticket. The power of the purse is the real power. Oh you're not meeting the national standards? No more Federal funding. You don't want to install our federally trained bureaucrat from the national cop college? Well sounds like you aren't meeting the cultural benchmarks, no funding for you. How many states are running huge defecits? Who is going to pay for the police? If the Feds can make agencies comply by cutting off their funding, then who really controls the police department?

pg. 78 - "Provide support to national police leadership associations and national rank and file organizations to encourage them to implement task force recommendations."

Here is where we give money to police associations and organizations to get them on board with this nationalization program.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2015, 12:01:42 AM by Mr.X »
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BuddhaForce

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Re: [BS File] Building An American Gestapo
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2015, 11:48:07 PM »
A timeline of police militarization
http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/fault-lines/FaultLinesBlog/2014/2/25/a-history-of-policemilitarization.html



1966; SWAT is born

LAPD Inspector Daryl Gates, who would serve as police chief from 1978 to 1992, begins to trumpet the development of an elite squad trained in military tactics to respond to complex threats, like the previous summer?s Watts riots?which included looting and police being fired on by snipers. Gates invited a group of ex-Marines to train a small unit. He called it SWAT, for Special Weapons Attack Team. The acronym would later be toned down to Special Weapons and Tactics.


August 1, 1966; Texas tower shootings

Ex-Marine Charles Whitman goes on a shooting rampage at the University of Texas in Austin, killing 15 people. The massacre increases the momentum for the development of SWAT teams in large cities around the country.


December 6, 1969; The first SWAT raid

In its first raid, Gates? SWAT team storms the L.A. headquarters of the Black Panther Party. Five thousand rounds of ammunition are exchanged between the police and the Black Panthers, with four men on each side sustaining injuries. There were no deaths in the multi-hour standoff.


July 29, 1970; Legalization of no-knock warrants

President Richard Nixon signs the District of Columbia Court Reform and Criminal Procedure Act of 1970, a bill aimed specifically at lowering crime in the Washington, D.C., area. It includes a controversial no-knock provision that allows police officers to enter a home to serve a warrant without alerting the people inside to their presence. Three months later, Nixon signs an omnibus drug bill that extends that authority to police precincts beyond the capital.


December 1, 1981; Knowledge sharing between military and police

The Military Cooperation with Law Enforcement Agencies Act is enacted. In his 2006 white paper for the Cato Institute, ?Overkill: The Rise of Paramilitary Police Raids in America,? Balko writes, the law ?authorized the military to train civilian police officers to use the newly available equipment and not only encouraged the military to share drug-war-related information with civilian police but authorized the military to take an active role in preventing drugs from entering the country.?


October 12, 1984; ?Policing for profit? era begins

Under the Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984, civilian law enforcement agencies working with the feds on drug cases get a cut of assets seized during raids. According to Balko, it has a profound effect ?on drug policing over the next 30 years.? Retired LAPD Commander Stephen Downing refers to this policy as ?policing for profit.? The provision was an augmentation of the RICO law passed in 1970, which allows the government to go after any property involved in the commission of a crime.


November 18, 1988; Government grants for local police

So-called Byrne grants are created as part of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. The program, named in honor of fallen New York City cop Edward Byrne, resulted in the transfer of billions of dollars from the federal government to local police agencies. Strong drug enforcement stats were key to getting the grants, which pushed police departments to form narcotics task forces wholly focused on conducting drug raids.


September 23, 1996; Transferring military equipment to police

The Law Enforcement Support Program, which makes it even easier to transfer military property to local police forces, is created as part of the National Defense Authorization Security Act of 1997. In the more than 15 years since the program began, more than $4.3 billion worth of equipment has been transferred to civilian police.


2005; SWAT and small-town America

SWAT teams serve an increasing number of search warrants. According to statistics from Peter Kraska at Eastern Kentucky University, 50,000 to 60,000 SWAT raids took place in the United States in 2005?up from 30,000 in 1995.
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BuddhaForce

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Re: [BS File] Building An American Gestapo
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2015, 04:56:58 PM »
Boston Redux: Door to Door Searches For Covict Escapees.
http://chronicle.northcoastnow.com/2015/06/10/house-searches-resume-escaped-new-york-prisoners/

Here we go again, 2 convicts have recently escaped from the Dannemora prison are on the run and the police state is now swooping in, just like we saw in Watertown after the Boston Marathon Bombings. Now 450 armed to the teeth police are going door to door now and clearing people out:

Quote
State Police said the fifth day of searching will entail going from house to house in Dannemora, where David Sweat and Richard Matt cut their way out of the Clinton Correctional Facility. The house searches aren?t the result of any new leads and law enforcement is retracing its steps made soon after the escape, troopers said.

?They?ll be doing a 100 percent sweep from the prison right out, see how that goes,? said David Favro, the sheriff for Clinton County, where the prison is located, about 20 miles from the Canadian border.

Quote
Hundreds of law enforcement officers swept through the small Adirondack foothills town. Searchers walked shoulder to shoulder, wearing bulletproof vests and carrying sidearms as they went through hilly woods, fields and swamps, checking every home, garage, shed and outbuilding, then yelling, ?Clear!? when there were no signs of the inmates.


http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/crime/article/Sweep-in-small-town-for-2-escaped-killed-comes-up-6317687.php#photo-8129995

Quote
More than 450 federal and state law enforcement officers were taking part in the search, including customs agents, federal marshals and park rangers.



But a picture is worth 1,000 words...

https://twitter.com/zdhirsch/status/609099240736980992
https://twitter.com/jessemckinley/status/608676356726099971/photo/1
https://twitter.com/VanessaWPTZ/status/608639657971216384/photo/1
https://twitter.com/pressrepublican/status/608380307453181952
https://twitter.com/MechanEng/status/609144305601617920



Boston Redux

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MezLoczjfY[/youtube]



UPDATES

Here is video from Mashable of the cops going door to door.

[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2I3E51-PQy8[/youtube]


« Last Edit: June 12, 2015, 01:42:46 PM by Mr.X »
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